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The Domino Effect Russell Braziel

The shale revolution triggered The Domino Effect, a cascading series of events that has profoundly transformed energy markets, reshaped major related industries and remodeled the global economic and geopolitical landscape.

  The Domino Effect Author Russell Braziel   The Domino Effect Abstract The shale revolution triggered The Domino Effect, a cascading series of events that has profoundly transformed energy markets, reshaped major related industries and remodeled the global economic and geopolitical landscape. This book presents a unique, integrated perspective on natural gas, crude oil and natural gas

Tight oil market dynamics: Benchmarks, breakeven points,and inelasticities

Fig. 7. U.S. tight oil and shale gas drilled but uncompleted wells (EIA, 2017b) (dotted curve, right axis) and West Texas Intermediate crude oil price (EIA, 2017c) (solid curve, left axis) from January 2014 to April 2017.

Abstract When comparing oil and gas projects - their relative attractiveness, robustness, and contribution to markets - various dollar per barrel benchmarks are quoted in the literature and in public debates. Among these benchmarks are a variety of breakeven points (also called breakeven costs or breakeven prices), widely used to predict

Methane and the greenhouse-gas footprint of natural gas from shale formations

We evaluate the greenhouse gas footprint of natural gas obtained by high-volume hydraulic fracturing from shale formations, focusing on methane emissions. Natural gas is composed largely of methane, and 3.6% to 7.9% of the methane from shale-gas production escapes to the atmosphere in venting and leaks over the life- time of a well. These methane emissions are at least 30% more than and perhaps more than twice as great as those from conventional gas. The higher emissions from shale gas occur at the time wells are hydraulically fractured—as methane escapes from flow-back return fluids—and during drill out following the fracturing.

Methane and the greenhouse-gas footprint of natural gas from shale formations Robert W. Howarth1 • Renee Santoro • Anthony Ingraffea2 1Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Cornell  University, Ithaca,  NY 14853, USA. 2School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Cornell  University, Ithaca,  NY 14853, USA  Abstract We evaluate the greenhouse gas footprint of natural gas

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