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Mechanisms and Influence of Casing Shear Deformation near the Casing Shoe, Based on MFC Surveys during Multistage Fracturing in Shale Gas Wells in Canada

Figure 1. Geological stratification and well structure.

Mechanisms and Influence of Casing Shear Deformation near the Casing Shoe, Based on MFC Surveys during Multistage Fracturing in Shale Gas Wells in Canada

Abstract:

Casing shear deformation has become a serious problem in the development of shale gas fields, which is believed to be related to fault slipping caused by multistage fracturing, and the evaluation of the reduction of a casing’s inner diameter is key. Although many fault slipping models have been published, most of them have not taken the fluid-solid-heat coupling effect into account, and none of the models could be used to calculate the reduction of a casing’s inner diameter. In this paper, a new 3D finite element model was developed to simulate the progress of fault slipping, taking the fluid-solid-heat coupling effect during fracturing into account.

Authors

Yan Xi1, Jun Li1, Gonghui Liu1,2, Jianping Li3, and Jiwei Jiang1

1College of Petroleum Engineering, China University of Petroleum-Beijing, Beijing 102249, China. 2College of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Electronics Technology, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100022, China. 3CNPC Logging Co., LTD, Xi’an 710000, China

Received: 12 December 2018 / Accepted: 24 January 2019

For the purpose of increasing calculation accuracy, the elastoplastic constitutive relations of materials were considered, and the solid-shell elements technique was used. The reduction of the casing’s inner diameter along the axis was calculated and the calculation results were compared with the measurement results of multi-finger caliper (MFC) surveys. A sensitivity analysis was conducted, and the influences of slip distance, casing internal pressure, thickness of production and intermediate casing, and the mechanical parameters of cement sheath on the reduction of a casing’s inner diameter in the deformed segment were analyzed.

The numerical analysis results showed that decreasing the slip distance, maintaining high pressure, decreasing the Poisson ratio of cement sheath, and increasing casing thickness were beneficial to protect the integrity of the casing.

The numerical simulation results were verified by comparison to the shape of MFC measurement results, and had an accuracy up to 90.17%. Results from this study are expected to provide a better understanding of casing shear deformation, and a prediction method of a casing’s inner diameter after fault slipping in multistage fracturing wells.

Introduction

Horizontal well and multistage fracturing are the two key techniques for shale gas development, by creating complex fracture networks within tight formations [1,2,3,4,5]. Due to the fact that tens of thousands of cubic meters of fracturing fluid are pumped into the downholes of shale gas wells and injected into the matrix of shale reservoirs, geostatic stress can be changed due to the elastic response of the rock mass to hydraulic fracturing. Pore pressure can also be changed due to fluid diffusion along a permeable fault zone [6]. As a result of this, the casing string is exposed to a complex mechanical environment in the downhole, and therefore the risk of casing deformation increases dramatically [7,8,9].

Previous studies have shown that casing deformations were observed during multistage fracturing in the United States and China, where the commercial development of shale gas is underway and investment is on the rise [10,11]. Casing deformation has created a lot of problems for shale gas well completion and development, for example, bridge plugs could not be run to the projected depth, and normal stimulation operations were unable to be carried out. As a result of this, some fracturing sections either needed to be repaired, which increased the cost of well completion, or could only be abandoned, which decreased the productivity of the shale gas wells. In addition, based on previous studies about casing deformation in conventional oil and gas wells, it is known that casing deformation always intensifies over time, which could lead to security issues for the public or the shut-in of the well. Therefore, there is an urgent need to analyze the mechanisms and propose effective solutions for casing deformation.

Multi-finger calipers (MFC) and lead molds are two effective tools for monitoring the deformation features of the deformed part of a casing [12,13]. Based on investigations into casing deformation by using both tools in China, there were four different types of casing deformations that were delineated, including extrusion deformation, shear deformation, bending deformation, and buckling. Casing shear deformation represented the largest portion of all of the deformed points.

Statistic data showed that: (a) up to March 2016, a total of 90 horizontal wells were successfully fractured in Weiyuan-Changning block, Sichuan basin, casing deformation occurred in 32 wells, and 47 deformed points were found [14,15]. 61.7% of all the casing deformed points were examplse of shear deformation [16], and (b) by the end of May 2018, six horizontal wells were successfully fractured in Weirong block, where casing deformation occurred in five wells and 17 deformed points were found.

Most of the deformed points were due to shear deformation. Serious casing deformation has occurred during multistage fracturing in shale gas wells in Simonette, Canada, although there is no previous public data. MFC surveys were conducted in five pads, including 28 wells in this study, and the statistical data showed that 52.2% of all the deformed points were due to shear deformation. From the above data, it can be seen that the study of the mechanisms of casing shear deformation appears to be particularly important to the research on casing deformation during multistage fracturing in shale gas wells.

Many related studies have been carried out, but most of them emphasized the inducement of casing shear deformation [17]. Based on the previous research work, faults were easily reactivated when fracturing fluid flew into the cracks in the formation, and were more likely to slip along the unstable bedding planes or natural fractures under the action of their own gravity or external forces [18,19]. Then, the casing strings which passed through the faults were sheared. Qian et al. [20] pointed out that formation stress changed, due to opened and propped hydraulic fractures, and caused natural fractures to open or slip, which increased the risk of casing shear deformation.

According to the microseismic data, Zoback and Snee [21] believed that the high pore pressure generated during hydraulic fracturing operations induced slip on preexisting fractures and faults with a wide range of orientations. Meyer et al. [11] analyzed the seismic data and multi-finger caliper data, and suggested that shear failure of pre-existing faults was likely the main cause of casing deformation. Some scholars have proposed a similar viewpoint and complimented the study, pointing out that when the borehole trajectory was inclined upward along the formation, after fracturing fluid flowed into the shale beddings, the fault could slip because of the effect of gravity [15,16].

The mechanisms of fault slippage during or after multistage fracturing were discussed in most of the current research, but few have calculated the variation of the casing’s inner diameter, which was the determining factor of whether the bridge plug could pass through the deformed part of the casing, and therefore should be the evaluation basis for effective solutions to address the problem of casing shear deformation.

Analysts can more precisely identify the deformation situation of a casing’s deformed parts by using an MFC tool. Some scholars have expounded upon the application of an MFC tool in conventional oil and gas wells, which indicated that MFC data could accurately reflect the actual deformation of the casing string in the well [12,13,22]. Despite the clear benefits of MFC surveys, this kind of technique remains challenging to implement in extensive regional oil and gas fields, due to the significant cost of a full system. As a result, there has been little research providing the evidence of MFC data, and only some conducted prospective studies.

Marc [22] collected MFC measurement results from 30 wells from 2003 to 2013, showing that the shear deformation features were localized over a relatively short length (several feet), and resulted from a relative displacement of the upper part of the well compared to the lower part. According to the measurement results of the MFC tool, some mathematical and numerical models were established to simulate the progress of fault slipping, so as to calculate the degree of casing shear deformation. Gao et al. [23] analyzed the characteristics of casing shear deformation, established a 3D finite element model to simulate the stress-strain status and the deformation process, and pointed out that no cementing near the position of slipping was beneficial to the mitigation of casing shear deformation.

Chen et al. [16] presented a mathematical model for establishing the relationship between microseismic moment magnitude and degree of casing sheared deformation. Guo et al. [24] developed a numerical model and calculated the influences of slip distance, slip angle, and the mechanical parameters of cement sheath on casing stress. But few of the above studies analyzed the difference between measurement results and actual deformation, and have not put forward solutions to casing shear deformation and showed their validity in engineering in practice. Therefore, it is still a great challenge to solve the problem of casing shear deformation.

In this study, MFC surveys on casing deformation in Canada were implemented, and the mechanisms of casing shear deformation that occurred at the interface between different layers were studied. A new 3D numerical model was developed to simulate the progress of fault slipping, the variation of a casing’s inner diameter along the axis was calculated based on the analysis of MFC surveys. The numerical simulation results were verified through the measured data. Six influential factors, including the slip distance, casing inner pressure, thickness of production casing and intermediate casing, and mechanical parameters of cement sheath were analyzed. Furthermore, proposals for mitigation or avoidance of casing shear deformation were suggested, and some of them were applied to the engineering in practice and were proven to be effective.

Overview of Casing Shear Deformation in Simonette

Field Description

Simonette is one of the most important shale gas blocks in Canada, and is located in the west of Alberta Basin. The shale reservoir is situated in the Upper Devonian Duvernay Formation (Woodbend Group), which is composed of multicyclic units of black organic-rich shale and bituminous carbonates, ranging between 25 and 60 m in thickness [25], and extends throughout most of central Alberta. The vertical depth of the reservoir is approximately 3800–3950 m, and the Duvernay Formation exhibits a westward increase in thermal maturity from the immature to the gas-generation zone [26]. Much of the Duvernay Formation in the area of optimal maturity is overpressured, with noted cases beyond gradients of 1.9 MPa/100m in deep basin settings [25,27]. And the temperature gradient is approximately 3.3–3.7 °C/100 m.

Figure 1. Geological stratification and well structure.

Figure 1. Geological stratification and well structure.

Figure 1 displays the typical well architecture deployed for the development of Simonette. The main drilling phases are: (1) a 349 mm section drilled from the wellhead to approximately 620 m; (2) a 222 mm section drilled from the previous shoe down to the Ireton formation (the true vertical depth (TVD) is approximately 3750 m), including the vertical section and part of indication section; (3) a 171 mm section drilled from the previous shoe down to the Duvernay formation (the TVD is approximately 3885 m), including part of indication section and the whole horizontal section. The depth of the interface between the Nisku and Ireton formations is about 3742 m. It is worth noting that this interface happens to cross-cut the intermediate casing, which is close to the casing shoe.

Casing Shear Deformation

Casing perforation completion and bridge plug staged fracturing were adopted in shale gas wells in Simonette. The number of fracturing segments was approximately 40, each stage was injected with about 1500 m3 of fracturing fluid, with a displacement of 12–14 m3/min and pumping pressure of over 70 MPa. 5 pads including 28 wells were investigated by MFC surveys. Casing deformation occurred in 16 wells during multistage fracturing. 23 deformed points were found, and there were five different types of deformed points, including extrusion deformation, shear deformation, bending deformation, buckling, and casing holes, as shown in Figure 2. Statistical data showed that 52.2% of all of the deformed points were shear deformation.

Figure 2. Five types of casing deformation and their respective proportions.

Figure 2. Five types of casing deformation and their respective proportions.

Furthermore, the shear deformed points can be classified into two types according to the positions of occurrence: (a) the first type of shear deformed points was located at the position of the interface between the Nisku and Ireton formations, and accounted for 75% of the total shear deformed points; (b) the second type of shear deformed points was located in the horizontal segment, and accounted for 25%. Therefore, it is very meaningful to clarify the mechanism of the first type of casing shear deformation, which is also the aim of this study.

From the introduction above, it is known that the production and intermediate casings were cross-cut by the interface between the Ireton and Nisku formations. According to the statistical data about the depth of the first type of casing shear deformation, all of the shear deformed points occurred at the interface and in the bottom production casing above the casing shoe, as shown in Figure 3. In addition, the lengths of the deformed parts were relatively short, about 1.2–2 m.

Figure 3. Locations of the first type of casing shear deformed points.

Figure 3. Locations of the first type of casing shear deformed points.

Difference Between Measurement Results and Actual Shear Deformation

MFC data can be used to assess the inner conditions of the casing after deformation. As a result of this, shear deformation features identified in the casing turned out to be critical. During the research process, most scholars considered an MFC tool that was centered in the casing, and ignored the transition from measurement results to actual deformation morphology. Indeed, when the MFC tool string runs through the deformation position in the casing, the two centralizers force the middle of the tool string (including the caliper tool) off-center (Figure 4a), which affects the measurement data, and therefore the 3D morphology reflected by the rough data is incorrect.

Figure 4. Schematic diagram and comparison of measurement results and actual conditions.

Figure 4. Schematic diagram and comparison of measurement results and actual conditions.

The difference between the shapes reflected from rough measurement results and actual deformation is illustrated in Figure 4b. From the 3D views of the rough data, it can be seen that the casing appears to be sheared in the upper and lower portions, but the reality shown after data transition indicates that the casing was sheared only at one side. This illustrates that negligence of this condition can lead to wholly misleading results. The deviation of the casing was defined as the degree of casing shear deformation, and statistical data showed the degree had already reached almost 45 mm. The deformation degree (Figure 4b) can be used to describe the slip distance to some extent, but can not be used to measure the reduction of the casing’s inner diameter. Therefore, the deformation degree can not be used as the basis of evaluating whether the bridge plug could pass through the deformed part. As a result of this, the relationship between slip distance and the reduction of the casing’s inner diameter should be established.

Mechanisms of Casing Shear Deformation induced by Multistage Fracturing

Mechanisms of Casing Shear Deformation

Previous studies have proven that fault slipping was the main reason for casing shear deformation. On the basis of worldwide observations, casing shear deformation caused by fault slipping can be classified into three main categories:


Emanuel Martin
Emanuel Martin is a Petroleum Engineer graduate from the Faculty of Engineering and a musician educate in the Arts Faculty at National University of Cuyo. In an independent way he’s researching about shale gas & tight oil and building this website to spread the scientist knowledge of the shale industry.
http://www.allaboutshale.com

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